Friday, November 16, 2007

Flying Again!

We had great weather on the Easter weekend, and I managed to get into the air on the 8th and 9th for an hour each day. Flying around the local area never really gets boring, as you might think it would. Environmental conditions are always a little different, the changing light produce interesting variations in the scenery, and there are always different people out on the land, in different places and doing different things.

One can never lose sight of the fact that flying an airplane is serious business, of course. A pilot license is simply a piece of paper allowing you to go out and practice. A good pilot is always practicing and learning, and never gets to know everything. Still, a lot of fun can be had while doing all that serious stuff.

However, I think I need an objective, a mission. Perhaps I'll fly down to the Mouse Lake exploration camp for a day sometime. I'll need their permission, of course - UNOR built the ice strip on the lake, so they decide who uses it. I'll just have to keep out of the way of all those Twin Otters and A-Stars shuttling back and forth from the camps to Kugluktuk.

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If anyone is interested in ultralight flying, here's a very well-put-together video of my friend Ian Coristine flying his beautiful red, float-equipped Challenger in the Thousand Islands area of Ontario. Ian has his own island getaway. Another buddy of mine, Bruce Brown, is flying the cameraman in the "chase plane". Ian was the guy who sold me my Challenger four years ago, and Bruce was my co-pilot during our flight from Montreal to Edmonton in my own Challenger in September of 2005.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=bs94r8CcAAg

The quality of the video is superb and I suspect that is because they have used "deleted" hi-definition scenes from a "Things That Move" episode on History Television that was aired a couple of weeks ago.

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Photo: "Buddy" is a mongrel, mostly-husky. Appropriately named, he's the greatest mutt, extremely friendly, fairly smart, and without a mean bone in his body. He's about three-years old now, and was rescued after being abandoned as a puppy.

His best friend is "Lady", aged nine years, a purebred though somewhat atypical beagle. The two of them are inseperable. Lady has the usual beagle one-track mind, difficult to train but an instinctive hunter with an amazing nose. I don't think I could ever train her to sniff out contraband, but she could find a sliver of beef jerky in the hold of a supertanker.


Larry

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